Skip to content

Blog

DfontSplitter 1.0 on the Mac App Store

I recently completed my rewrite of DfontSplitter for Mac, my tool for converting Mac-formatted Dfont, Font Suitcase and TTC font files into TTF files.

This new version is written in Swift, targets macOS Mojave (10.14) and later and meets all the requirements that soon will be required of Mac software (code signing, notarisation/delivery via Mac App Store).

It’s available on the Mac App Store, with source code now available on GitHub.

The “T with chisel” DfontSplitter icon is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. The icon includes a modified version of “Chisel wood 24mm” by Isabelle Grosjean, which is also licensed as such.

The old “T with pencil” DfontSplitter icon is from the Oxygen Icon set and is licensed under the Creative Commons BY-SA 3.0 Unported licence. Please see the More Information pages for Windows and Mac for full licensing information.

Apple, the Apple logo and Mac are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries and regions. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.

“Live Photos in FaceTime” Bug

So, the iOS 12.1.4 and MacOS Mojave 10.14.3 Supplemental updates are out, fixing Grant Thompson’s reported FaceTime groups bug. You know, the one that turned your device into a listening device…

(It’s at least something that Apple acknowledged that the reporting process for security issues from non-developers needs to be improved.)

I note that one of the other security fixes in this release is explained as follows:

Live Photos in FaceTime Available for: iPhone 5s and later, iPad Air and later, and iPod touch 6th generation

Impact: A thorough security audit of the FaceTime service uncovered an issue with Live Photos

Description: The issue was addressed with improved validation on the FaceTime server.

CVE-2019-7288: Apple

APPLE-SA-2019-2-07-1 iOS 12.1.4

It’s good that they thought it wise to do a thorough audit on the rest of FaceTime, but why is this bug so poorly explained? “Uncovered an issue”? Of what scope? Of what severity?

Perhaps security issues Apple discovers internally don’t get disclosed, to provide an additional layer of obscurity if they believe others aren’t yet aware of them? Perhaps this is a server-side bug only? (But if it is, why note it in the client OS release?)

It is an unusual practice (even for a company as secretive as Apple) to provide a line and a CVE reference and so on, but not give any detail at all in the public release notes.

The Case of the Rogue Caching Servers (Unable to Download iOS Apps Over The Air)

macOS Server

A recent version of iTunes dropped support for downloading and syncing apps to iOS devices — the only methods for this are now using the App Store, Apple Configurator(?), or having some other over-the-air MDM solution push the apps to devices.

This caused me to run into a little bit of an issue in my day job — we’d been having sporadic issues doing over-the-air app updates on our corporate network, but when devices were taken off site, apps would update perfectly. I had been sort-of ignoring, sort-of working around this by downloading the apps to a desktop running iTunes and syncing (a small(!) number of) devices by Lightning cable.

But, now my workaround feature was gone! What was I to do? The story here is true, but some names and specific technical details have been omitted for professional privacy!

I was curious, so I did a packet dump or two and discovered the iOS devices were talking happily to the iTunes Store as you’d expect they should, but that when it came to actually downloading the app’s bits, they were contacting an IP address in a private range!

» Read the rest of this post…

Filesystem? What New Filesystem?

A quite legitimate criticism of iOS for some time has been the fact that you seem to end up with multiple gigabytes of unexplained “other” disk space usage after using the device for some time. It’s frustrating, especially on smaller devices.

Reinstalling iOS and restoring from your most recent backup would clear the mythical “other”, at least for a while.

It seems that the latest update to iOS, version 10.3, introduces a whole new filesystem technology, APFS. This wasn’t mentioned in the release notes, and is only really detectable by the end user in the form of a much longer upgrade process than would be needed for a typical iOS release.

Since upgrading a few devices, I have noticed a big jump in the available free space on those devices. The pesky “other” is still there, but appears to have shrunk significantly.

Hats of to Apple for fixing what was a criticism going a long way back, and for managing a quite potentially disruptive filesystem migration in such a transparent way for the end user.

May the “other” space usage forever remain small.

Running SpinRite 6.0 on a Mac

SpinRite logo

SpinRite is a fantastic tool for repairing and maintaining hard drives, and I am proud to say that its purchase price has been more than recouped on drives that it has brought back into service that would otherwise have needed replacing!

Running it on an Intel Mac hasn’t been possible with version 6.0. It actually boots fine, but there is no way to give keyboard input, and thus there is no way to kick off a scan.

Reports that people had succeeded at getting SpinRite to work on various weird and wonderful platforms indirectly, using VirtualBox and its raw disk access mode, led me to experiment with this to run SpinRite on a Mac. This is particularly useful on iMacs where pulling the hard drive out of the case is… undesirable(!)

This is an advanced, technical process.

Performing the wrong operations when you have raw access to the disk, a technique this process uses, can cause you to lose data. You must have a backup.

Obviously, I do not accept any responsibility and cannot help if you break things by using these notes. Hard hats must be worn beyond this point. All contractors must report to the site office.

Boot from another disk

You’ll need a working MacOS install on another disk that you can boot from, as we need to unmount all the volumes on the disk to be scanned in order to gain raw access to the disk. I use SuperDuper to make bootable backups, and these work great for this purpose too.

Prepare the Environment

Make sure you have VirtualBox installed, with the optional Command Line Tools.

Turn off screen savers, sleep timers and screen lock, just in case the VM has taken keyboard input away from you and you are unable to unlock the Mac to check on SpinRite’s progress. It’s certainly not an ideal situation to have to pull the plug on the computer while that VM has raw access to your target disk!

Identify the Target Disk

It is critical that you identify the BSD device name for the whole disk that you want to operate on. In my case, I’d booted from disk1 and the SpinRite target disk was disk0.

Determine the correct disk identifiers with:

diskutil list

diskutil list

» Read the rest of this post…

QuickArchiver on Thunderbird — Archiving Messages to the Right Folder with One Click

QuickArchiver icon

Even despite the dominance of webmail, I have long used a traditional desktop email client. I like having a local mail archive should “the cloud” have trouble, as well as the ability to exert control over the user interface and user experience. (That might be partly a euphemism for not having to see ads!)

Apple’s Mail.app built into macOS (going to have to get used to not calling it OS X!) has served me pretty well for quite some time now, alongside Thunderbird when I’m on Linux, and while Mail.app offered the most smooth interface for the platform, it didn’t always have all the features I wanted.

For example, being able to run mail rules is more limited than I wanted in Mail.app. I could have rules run automatically as messages arrived in my inbox, or disable them entirely. But actually how I wanted to use rules was to be able to cast my eye over my inbox, and then bulk archive (to a specific folder) all emails of a certain type if I’d decided none needed my fuller attention.

Recently, I moved to Thunderbird on my Mac for managing email and discovered QuickArchiver.

As well as letting you writing rules yourself, QuickArchiver offers the clever feature of learning which emails go where, and then suggesting the right folder to which that message can be archived with a single click.

It’s still early days, but I am enjoying this. Without spending time writing rules, I’m managing email as before, and QuickArchiver is learning in the background what rules should be offered. The extra column I’ve added to my Inbox is now starting to populate with that one-click link to archive the message to the correct folder!

It’s just a nice little add-on if, like me, you (still??) like to operate in this way with your email.

DfontSplitter 0.4.2 for Mac — Critical Security Update

DfontSplitter icon

Today I release DfontSplitter 0.4.2 for Mac. This is a critical security update that fixes an issue relating to the Sparkle software update framework when the update pages are served over HTTP. As of 0.4.2, the update pages are now, naturally, served over HTTPS. (It was more than five years ago when the last release was made!)

The vulnerability means that in a scenario where an attacker could launch a man-in-the-middle attack during a Sparkle-enabled app’s update detection process, arbitrary JavaScript could execute in the WebView hosting the release notes. Due to the context that the WebView runs in, the app could then be convinced to run local files, expose local files to a remote server and even execute arbitrary code. More details and a full breakdown are at the post on Vulnerable Security.

This update fixes the Sparkle-related security issue by updating Sparkle and requiring HTTPS for all future DfontSplitter app update communications. Due to new build requirements in Xcode 7.2, the application now requires at least OS X Snow Leopard (10.6) and a 64-bit Intel processor.

The automatic updates feature within DfontSplitter should detect the update, but you can also download and install it manually.

Thanks to Kevin Chen for pointing out the existence of the issue with Sparkle and that it affected DfontSplitter. I had somehow missed the original reporting of the vulnerability, so I particularly appreciate Kevin bringing this to my timely attention.

The astute among you may note that in the Info.plist for this update, I explicitly disable the OS X 10.11 SDK’s check for HTTPS forward secrecy in the HTTPS communications to the update server. Once I figure out a cipher suite configuration that I am happy with, and understand, in Pound (my reverse proxy acting as the TLS terminus), I will update the app again to require forward secrecy.

Apple Event Brain Dump

Some very raw and unfiltered thoughts on today’s Apple announcement:

I thought after all this time there’d be more content deals for the new Apple TV — the “apps” focus suggests that they are having to concede their former approach entirely and acknowledge that they won’t funnel much TV content through iTMS at all.

Harry Potter photos!

4K video capture on a phone is pretty amazing.

The MLB Apple TV app demo with watching two games at once must have been a Back to the Future II reference for 2015 — “give me channels 5, 9…”. Right? Right?

I’m interested to see (hopefully non-fanboy/girlish) thoughts on how the iPad Pro will compare with the Surface range. It’s interesting to me actually that if MS get the touchy style apps done well (they have to do a better job than with Win8!), the Surfaces also having the flexibility to run classic Windows apps too might make them more competitive in that “pro tablet” area.

I want to go play with 3D Touch when I can! If they’ve done it well, it could be quite cool.

I’m no artist in drawing terms, but the Pencil looked pretty amazing. I was deriding it at first as a silly stylus. I was wrong.

So. Much. Stuff!

Notes on Creating an Encrypted Bootable SuperDuper Backup

SuperDuper icon

SuperDuper is one of my favourite backup applications for the Mac, and I use it as part of my backup and recovery strategy.

One of its benefits is creating a bootable clone, so in the case of any trouble, you can connect the backup drive, hold Option/Alt and boot your alternative system.

The world has changed since I first used this tool, and full-disk encryption is now essential for maintaining privacy and “not-having-your-life-turned-upside-down” in the event of a loss of control of the drive with your life on it. FileVault on OS X since Lion works beautifully for your boot drive, but unfortunately I had to sacrifice the bootability of my SuperDuper backup in order to ensure it was encrypted.

Recently, a drive failure on my SuperDuper backup drive (yep, they do happen, and that’s why we back up!) required me to replace the drive. That gives a good excuse to play, and try and make a bootable and encrypted backup — FileVault-style, but on an external disk that we manage ourselves.

» Read the rest of this post…

Better

On the face of it, this is just another corporate “aren’t we so great” feel-good video, the kind that we have every right to look at cynically.

However, and at the significant risk of being judged a Tim Cook fanboi, I actually think something has changed under his leadership. Even if it is just that we are allowed to see more of this side of Apple now, Tim’s tenure so far seems to be bringing about a much stronger focus on values than ever before.

We have their ‘Intention’ video, Tim’s public musings at the Fuqua School of Business, and perhaps more importantly, actions like their Supplier Responsibility work and bringing the manufacturing of the new Mac Pro to the USA.

‘There are some ideas we want every company to copy’

Perhaps what is most exciting about this new, very public, focus on these issues is the idea that ethics can become a point of competition.

Not every customer is going to care about this stuff, but most people will want to feel like they’re doing the right thing. The pressure that companies like Apple can put on their competitors might be one of the most effective tools for actually making a difference to a whole industry’s behaviour.

I hope we see that.